Recently climate change has been a big issue that is being discussed at almost all the major global summits with the emphasis being laid on the detrimental effects that it has wreaked all across the globe. Perhaps one of the most identifiable aspects of this climate change can be attributed to deforestation. With rapid industrialization and globalization, the need for more land and resources has driven societies to deplete its natural resources to a point of no return. While everyone is brushing off the issue and demanding answers from the other party, the scenario continues to grow graver and unfortunately is deteriorating beyond repair every single day.
Put deforestation can be termed as the removal of vegetation or green cover from the surface of the soil. While the problem seems to be pretty easy to deal with, the main back draw with deforestation is the extremely fast rate with which it’s propagating making it extremely difficult to curb. According to the World Wildlife Foundation, almost 60 per cent of the earth’s green cover has been depleted, and the remaining left is in a precarious balance with humankind. Virgin rainforests are becoming a thing of the past, and more and more species are being added to the list of endangered ones.
Deforestation is something that has travelled across the centuries to haunt us. Early prehistoric nomadic tribes often used to clear patches of forests, making the land for cultivation. Though the modern practice of this has translated to the fury of commercial crops, a certain species of plant which is grown over the local endemic species. As a result, many minor species, especially ferns, have joined the ranks of endangered or even extinct species. This has, in turn, affected the local wildlife terribly, disrupting the food chain and often forcing animals to move outside of their natural habitats in search of sustenance.
Not to forget the havoc that both legal and illegal felling of trees for logs has done to the existing forest covers. Many African nations have now opened up their natural reserves to be exploited by foreign powers for bolstering their economy. Canada’s forest cover is dwindling due to the vast timber industry present, and India’s mangroves are going to be a thing of the past. War has also left its mark on the natural world. World War II wiped out the whole series of virgin forests and the Vietnam war ruined much of the forest cover.
One might ask why to raise the hue and cry about deforestation. One major reason would be the terrible future it predicts for us humanity. Natural calamities, reduced soil fertility, global warming, rising ocean levels and reduced rainfall are just a brief idea of what is to come. If immediate action is not being taken to at least preserve the little of whatever we have remaining the future looks extremely grim for humankind. Without the green aspect of our planet, we are better off being like another dead solar body like Pluto. It is high time that all of us come together to create a better future for our children.

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